The Impact of COVID-19 on People Suffering from Chronic Pain

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Lead researcher: Dr Lin Yu (Middlesex University London)

Researchers wanted to find out how people with chronic pain (i.e., pelvic, stomach, back, neck, shoulder, nerve pain etc.) were affected by the pandemic, and what they could potentially do to help. Specifically, they hoped to understand the psychological impact of the pandemic.

555 patients took part in the study which is currently under review at Journal of Pain - a high-impact peer-reviewed scientific journal. COVID-19 fear was related to pain, pain-related disability, depression, and work. Overall, they found that the psychological impact of COVID-19 was associated with poorer ability to cope with everyday tasks in people with chronic pain. People who exhibit psychological flexibility (the ability to cope and adapt when faced with a crisis or significant stress) were more protected from the psychological impact of the pandemic.

To learn more about steps that Crohn's & Colitis UK are taking to tackle pain in IBD, please check out our Pain Collaborative initiative