Developing a better understanding of tissue-resident CD8+ T cells in causing IBD

2017

2017


By improving the detection and understanding of immune cells called “tissue-resident CD8+ T cells we hope to be able to target them with new treatments that will reduce inflammation in patients with IBD

Dr Daniele Corridoni, University of Oxford 


What is this research looking at?


The researchers want to investigate the problems in the immune system that lead to the inflammation commonly seen in IBD patients. The research group has been investigating the different cell populations found in the human gut during endoscopy, and examining them using new innovative lab techniques. One of these techniques is called “single cell RNA sequencing” which allows them to investigate rare or difficult to access cells which previously have not been analysed, but may be very important in the development of IBD.


The study will define the nature and function of a specific population of immune cells in the gut calls “tissue-resident CD8+ T cells (Trm). When these cells gather in the gut, inflammation may occur and abnormalities of their function could explain why IBD develops in some patients. Researchers hope this new technique of single cell RNA sequencing will provide new information about the actions of these Trm cells.

What do researchers think this could mean for people with IBD? 


The researchers hope that by improving the detection and understanding of immune cells called tissue-resident CD8+ T cells (Trm) which cause inflammation in the intestine, they will then be able to target these cells directly with new treatments that will reduce inflammation in patients with IBD.


Who is leading this research: Dr Daniele Corridoni, University of Oxford 

Our Funding: £25,000
Duration: 24 months
Grant reference: M2017-1
Official title of application: Phenotypic and functional analysis of resident CD8+ T cells in intestinal mucosa in health and inflammatory bowel disease utilizing single cell approaches
Tags: IBD and cells